12:52 am - Tue, Oct 21, 2014
1,017 notes

wilwheaton:

(via Cartoon: The house of feeeaaaarrrr)

12:38 am
590 notes


12:35 am
3,083 notes

emptyfantasies:

EmptyFantasies’ Character Mood Boards - 8/?

Draco Malfoy - Harry Potter Series

emptyfantasies:

EmptyFantasies’ Character Mood Boards - 8/?

Draco Malfoy - Harry Potter Series

(via malfoymannor)


2:29 am - Tue, Oct 14, 2014
15 notes

lamejorjuventud:

Hannah Arendt ⎟ Margarethe von Trotta, 2012


2:26 am
19 notes

How right you are that I have no such love, and for two reasons: first, I have never in my life “loved” some nation or collective—not the German, French or American nation, or the working class, or whatever else might exist. The fact is that I love only my friends and am quite incapable of any other sort of love. Second, this kind of love for the Jews would seem suspect to me, since I’m Jewish myself. I don’t love myself or anything I know belongs to the substance of my being… The magnificence of this people once lay in its belief in God — that is, in the way its trust and love of God far outweighed its fear of God. And now this people believes only in itself? In this sense I don’t love the Jews, nor do I “believe” in them…. We would both agree that patriotism is impossible without constant opposition and critique. In this entire affair I can confess to you one thing: the injustice committed by my own people naturally provokes me more than injustice done by others.

2:26 am
21 notes

There may be truths beyond speech, and they may be of great relevance to man in the singular, that is, to man in so far as he is not a political being, whatever else he may be. Men in the plural, that is, men in so far as they live and move and act in this world, can experience meaningfulness only because they can talk with and make sense to each other and to themselves.
Hannah Arendt (via kontynuujjj)

2:25 am
19 notes

Heidegger says, with great pride: “People say that Heidegger is a fox.” This is the true story of Heidegger the fox: Once upon a time there was a fox who was so lacking in slyness that he not only kept getting caught in traps but couldn’t even tell the difference between a trap and a non-trap. This fox suffered from another failing as well. There was something wrong with his fur, so that he was completely without natural protection against the hardships of a fox’s life. After he had spent his entire youth prowling around the traps of people, and now that not one intact piece of fur, so to speak, was left on him, this fox decided to withdraw from the fox world altogether and to set about making himself a burrow. In his shocking ignorance of the difference between traps, he hit on an idea completely new and unheard of among foxes: He built a trap as his burrow. He set himself inside it, passed it off as a normal burrow—not out of cunning, but because he had always thought others’ traps were their burrows—and then decided to become sly in his own way and outfit for others the trap he had built himself and that suited only him. This again demonstrated great ignorance about traps: No one would go into his trap, because he was sitting inside it himself. This annoyed him. After all, everyone knows that, despite their slyness, all foxes occasionally get caught in traps. Why should a fox trap—especially one built by a fox with more experience of traps than any other—not be a match for the traps of human beings and hunters? Obviously because this trap did not reveal itself clearly enough as the trap it was! And so it occurred to our fox to decorate his trap beautifully and to hang up equivocal signs everywhere on it that quite clearly said: “Come here, everyone; this is a trap, the most beautiful trap in the world.” From this point on it was clear that no fox could stray into this trap by mistake. Nevertheless, many came. For this trap was our fox’s burrow, and if you wanted to visit him where he was at home, you had to step into his trap. Everyone except our fox could, of course, step out of it again. It was cut, literally, to his own measurement. But the fox who lived in the trap said proudly: “So many are visiting me in my trap that I have become the best of all foxes.” And there is some truth in that, too: Nobody knows the nature of traps better than one who sits in a trap his whole life long.
Hannah Arendt - Heidegger the Fox (via sulliedsubjects)

2:23 am
18 notes

kansassire:

Hannah Arendt, 2012, Margarethe von Trotta


2:23 am
19 notes

carlboygenius:

Hannah Arendt: One of the Greatest Philosophers of Our Time

She formulated the concept of "the banality of evil".


2:21 am
21 notes

Lies are so often much more plausible, more appealing to reason, than reality, since the liar has the great advantage of knowing beforehand what the audience wishes or expects to hear. He has prepared his story for public consumption with a careful eye to making it credible, whereas reality has the disconcerting habit of confronting us with the unexpected, for which we were not prepared.
Hannah Arendt (via maxsipowicz)
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